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Individual Scale Fingerings Section

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Defualt User ImageWorldDecay
5:37 am Wednesday
October 12, 2005
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On the GKN Learning Center, there's a section called [tiltle].

How do i use it?
For eg. inidiv chord fingering, i could use those chord forms and move it to the correct fret to get the chord i want.
User ImageMike Lindyn
1:24 pm Wednesday
October 12, 2005
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Thanks for the question Loyct,

The Individual Scale Fingerings Section is pretty much the same thing as the Individual Chord Fingerings Section and you explained that section well. In the scale section you can take the patterns in this section and place them on any a given fret to create the scale you want. For example if you start the dorian mode fingering on the 5th fret you create an A Dorian scale.

So the good thing about this section is you can learn the patterns used to create a whole bunch of scales and modes. These patterns are shown in box form and three note per string form. The bad part is that it doesn't tell you how these scales and modes are related to eachother. The section was intended to act as a suplument to the full fret board finder which does a good job at showing all the notes of a given scale but also makes it hard to find individual scale and chord fingers.

Now that I've created the Scales in Tab section the Individual Scale Fingerings Section is not nearly as important because people now have a way to learn all the modes of the most important scales.

How this answered your question,
Mike
Defualt User ImageWorldDecay
10:14 am Tuesday
October 18, 2005
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Very happy Thanks for the reply.

Well, just another question, you mentioned the A Dorian Scale. Is it the A dorian mode? or is there such as thing as dorian scales?
User ImageNate
7:48 pm Tuesday
October 18, 2005
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There is such thing as a Dorian scale as well as all the other modes. The intervals for the Dorian Scale are 1, 2, b3, 4, 5, 6, b7. It's actually quite simple how it works but I know if I tried to explain it I would stumble somewhere and really make it confusing. I can give you an example or two though and I'm sure someone else will come along and fill the rest out if you don't understand it. Smile

First though, you need to understand that one scale can have multiple different names because the modes between different scales run into each other along the way. There are only so many patterns you can make. An example of this are the different Pentatonics. If you play all five modes of the Major Pentatonic and then play all five modes of the Blues pentatonic, you'll notice that you encountered the exact same patterns even though they are two different scales. Wink



Examples;

the C Major/Ionian Scale is C, D, E, F, G, A, B
If you were to start on the D, you would be playing the Dorian mode of the C Major Scale. This is also the equivalent of playing the Ionian/first mode of the D Dorian scale. Get it? Make sure you understand this and then move on to the next part.

Now when starting out on the E note you would be playing the Phyrigian mode of the C Major scale or the Ionian mode of the E Phyrigian scale. Same idea as above, make sure you can see that. Not only that though, let's refer to the Dorian scale we've been talking about! E is the second note of the D Dorian Scale so you could also call this the Dorian mode of the D Dorian scale. And you could apply this to all the other Modal scales as well. Once you understand this, you can see that one single scale can have a handful of names. (Knowing which one to call it in different playing situations is another argument but is not important right now. For now, you can call the scale any of the different names above as well as the other ones you figure out on your own Wink ).

Get it? It's kind of confusing to explain but is really a simple concept. I'm sure that someone else will come along and explain it more clearly if you're completely lost. Laughing Ask any questions though if you can make out any of it. You need to really picture it in your head, the numbers, notes, and modes. If I see you on MSN tonight I'll try to break it down a little better. Diagrams would probably really help!
User ImageNate
7:57 pm Tuesday
October 18, 2005
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Just a note =

The Major Scale is the exact same thing as the Ionian Scale.
It may be easier to disregard "Major Scale" and refer to it as "Ionian Scale" to understand all this.
Defualt User ImageWorldDecay
7:46 am Wednesday
October 19, 2005
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Oh, so modes can help us solo over a changing (key) chord progression, rather than changing scales all the time?
User ImageBillyJack
12:49 pm Wednesday
October 19, 2005
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Quote From Loyct:
Oh, so modes can help us solo over a changing (key) chord progression, rather than changing scales all the time?
In essence yes. You first have to understand something about MODES. The term MODES as most use it is incomplete. It is in fact MODES OF THE MAJOR SCALE. Look at C for example. The C major scale consist of C>D>E>F>G>A>B>C (one octave) This is the IONIAN MODE OF THE MAJOR SCALE. Now let's look at a common C major chord progression. C,F,C,G,C. This is a 1,4,1,5,1 progression and probly the most common of all progressions. A simple lead for the C major could look like this:
1=(C>D>E>F>G>A>B>C) C major forwards
1=(C>B>A>G>F>E>D>C) C major backwards
4=(F>G>A>B>C>D>E>F) same notes of C major just started with from F going forward
4=(F>E>D>C>B>A>G>F) same notes of C major just started with from F going backwards
1=(C>D>E>F>G>A>B>C) C major forwards
1=(C>B>A>G>F>E>D>C) C major backwards
5=(G>A>B>C>D>E>F>G) same notes of C major just started with from G going forward
4=(F>G>A>B>C>D>E>F) same notes of C major just started with from F going forward
1=(C>D>E>F>G>A>B>C) C major forwards
1=(C>B>A>G>F>E>D>C) C major backwards
Notice I never hit a note that wasn't in the C Major scale, I just moved my tonal center from C to F to C to G then back to C. In effect I played the:
C Ionian mode = C Major Scale
F Lydian mode = F Augmented Scale
C Ionian mode = C Major Scale
G Mixolydian = G Dominate 7 Scale
C Ionian mode = C Major Scale
F Lydian mode = F Augmented Scale
G Mixolydian = G Dominate 7 Scale
C Ionian mode = C Major Scale

I can explain more later Gotta go for now.
User ImageBillyJack
12:25 am Thursday
October 20, 2005
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OK I'm back

Now you can look at that as if I had played 3 different scales and applied them to each chord change or 3 seperate modes but, they are in fact still, an extention if you will, of the C Major Scale. I just moved my starting point within the scale. If you'll notice in my examples, I didn't even change the order of the notes.

If you study the Major Scale to a point where you can play it forwards and backwards out of all 7 positions within the scale and learn to relate all seven possible starting positions to one another in random order then, you should be able to retain the various scales and modes with little effort as an adaptation of the Major.
Defualt User ImageWorldDecay
2:07 am Thursday
October 20, 2005
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So, there are no Modes For Minor Scale? Or Any other scale?
User ImageBillyJack
10:53 am Thursday
October 20, 2005
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Quote From Loyct:
So, there are no Modes For Minor Scale? Or Any other scale?
Well as of yet, I haven't found a need. I've studied and been taught to look at them from this perspective:
Ionian Mode is the Major Scale 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,1
Dorian Mode(b3/b7) is the 2,3,4,5,6,7,1,2 of the Major Scale and is a minor7
Phrygian Mode(b2,b3,b6,b7) is the 3,4,5,6,7,1,2,3 of the Major Scale and is a minor7 b2
Lydian Mode(#4) is the 4,5,6,7,1,2,3,4 of the Major and is a Augmented 4
Mixolydian Mode (b7) is the 5,6,7,1,2,3,4,5 of the Major and is a Dominate 7
Aeolian Mode(b3,b6,b7) is the 6,7,1,2,3,4,5,6 of the Major Scale and is the natural minor
Locrian(b2,b3,b5,b6,b7) is the 7,1,2,3,4,5,6,7 of the Major Scale and is a minor7 b2 diminished5
All the different scales that I'm aware of can be found it these patterns. Some may add a note or take notes away but there fundamentals are found here.

Now Jazz Minor kind of does have Modes but, it could be looked at as just flatten the 3rd of the Major and once identified just mind how that note relates to each Mode.
Defualt User ImageDan
12:32 am Friday
October 21, 2005
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You forgot the Depeche Mode. Just FYI.
User ImageNate
2:48 am Friday
October 21, 2005
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Laughing
User ImageBillyJack
3:15 am Friday
October 21, 2005
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Quote From Dan:
You forgot the Depeche Mode. Just FYI.
Defualt User ImageDan
5:22 am Sunday
October 23, 2005
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This thread is now complete. Good album, too.

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